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Development of a finite-difference method for computing a compressible laminar boundary layer with interaction

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Published by Administrator in Stanford University, Division of Engineering Mechanics

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    • Stanford University, Division of Engineering Mechanics


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      • Bibliographical references: p. 130-132.Contract number: AF-18(600)-1488Contract number: AF-49(638)-550

        StatementStanford University, Division of Engineering Mechanics
        PublishersStanford University, Division of Engineering Mechanics
        Classifications
        LC Classifications1960
        The Physical Object
        Paginationxvi, 62 p. :
        Number of Pages44
        ID Numbers
        ISBN 10nodata
        Series
        1
        2Stanford University.Division of Engineering Mechanics. Technical report -- no. 127
        3

        nodata File Size: 10MB.


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It has been observed that, an increase of volume fraction leads to the enhancement of velocity and temperature distributions.

Solution of the three

A hypersonic cruise missile is used as an example of how this hierarchical structure is formulated. The second-order effects have been computed for different values of Mach number, wall temperature, and injection parameter. Pertinent results are presented graphically and discussed quantitatively with respect to variation in bioconvection parameters. Various cooling hole designs and their performance are summarized.

Vectored injection into compressible laminar and turbulent boundary layers

A set of guidelines is proposed for designing and conducting validation experiments, supported by an explanation of how validation experiments are different from traditional experiments and testing. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a set of non-similar equations and solved numerically by an efficient implicit, iterative, finite-difference method.

An analysis was performed to study the effect of uniform transpiration velocity on free convection boundary-layer flow of a non-Newtonian fluid over a permeable vertical cone embedded in a porous medium saturated with a nanofluid. Our review of the literature has identified a number of authors who have contributed to the verification of CFD solutions [11,28,33,34,39—42,45,47,49,57,60,65,74,87—89,92,97,110,116,117,120,127,129—131,137—139,141,142,144,147,165,171,177,209,218,219,221,228,229,273,274,277,278,281,298,306—309,318,325,327,329,333—337,340,347,350,351,353].

For incompressible flow the methods investigated include three forms of the Crank-Nicolson scheme, four variations of the Keller box scheme and a modified box scheme. A comparative study of the present results with the results from the earlier works provides an excellent agreement. The governing equations are transformed to obtain a nondimensional form and a similarity-type transform is defined for the normal coordinate and velocity.

Then three gradually changed surface distribution models with the same planform for each concept were created. The discussion of validation assessment also encompasses a number of other important topics. Velocity spectra in the outer part of the boundary layer agreed well at low wavenumber for all grids in this range of mesh spacing, and increasing resolution acted to fill out the high-wavenumber end of the spectrum.