Last edited by Rosholt House
22.07.2021 | History

3 edition of The Wisconsin logging book, 1839-1939 found in the catalog.

The Wisconsin logging book, 1839-1939

An Introduction

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Published by Administrator in Rosholt House

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      • Bibliography: p. 293-294.Includes index.

        StatementRosholt House
        PublishersRosholt House
        Classifications
        LC Classifications1980
        The Physical Object
        Paginationxvi, 140 p. :
        Number of Pages41
        ID Numbers
        ISBN 10nodata
        Series
        1nodata
        2
        3
        -Daylight in the swamp -In the woods and “on the haul” -Chain loading -“Ginpole Johnson” and the woods jammer -The “hoisting machine” -Birth of the cant hook and peavey -The crosscut saw -Of sleds and sleighs -The icing tankers -The “Lima Shay” engine -Railroad logging -Life in camp -No talking at table -Sunday in camp -Thermometers abolished -The company town -The skidding tong -Rivers for transporation -The Wolf River drives -Bay boom -The “Chippeway” drive -Beef slough -The boom companies -Famous log jams -A river myth -The river rafting days -Making of a raft -The risks they took -Pilot fees and charges -Whipsaw to up-and-down saw -Circular saw to bandsaw -The bull slide -The greening of Wisconsin

        nodata File Size: 7MB.


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The Wisconsin logging book, 1839-1939 by Rosholt House Download PDF EPUB FB2


The Wisconsin Logging Book 1839

Logging crew in camp, 1895. The from the University of Wisconsin-Madison includes a dozen recordings of this song as sung by former lumberjacks; each singer places the event in a different location. During a visit to a nursing home in Oconto for a high school class we had a fellow, last name St. A brother to my husbands grandfather maybe worked in a Lumber Camp in Wisconsin in the beginning 1900. Taylor describes a typical menu: In the early camp days the main bill of fare was salt pork, navy beans, and flour.

May be very minimal identifying marks on the inside cover. Cover has no visible wear, and the dust jacket if applicable is included for hard covers. Tables set in the mess hall before loggers descend. If anyone want to have contact with me for more information — my mail is: anita.

We quote shipping for sets and oversized books. Satisfaction is guaranteed with every order. A book that looks new but has been read. Light rubbing to spine extremities and corners. Malcolm Rosholt, Rosholt House, 1982• Establishing a winter logging camp involved much preparation: timber rights were acquired; timber cruisers estimated the volume of timber by species; supplies, sleds, tools, and food for both people and animals were purchased and hauled in to the work site; a work force was hired; dams for river log drives or railroad spur lines were constructed; and finally, bunkhouses, mess halls, and other buildings were erected.

If your book order is heavy or oversized, we may contact you to let you know extra shipping is required. Loggers in camp with horses and oxen. CCC recruitment poster, 1939 This New Deal work program established by the federal government on May 5, 1933, employed more than two million men aged 18-25 to conserve natural resources.

Ruth Stoveken, Wisconsin Magazine of History vol. Light bumping to spine head and corners. Create a Want Tell us what you're looking for and once a match is found, we'll inform you by e-mail.

The The Wisconsin logging book that were in active operation in the early nineties and later served meals that would rival any good hotel. He said the lumberjacks amputated it in the woods since it was crushed then brought him to his house and told his wife of the The Wisconsin logging book.

Pie, cake, doughnuts 1839-1939 on the breakfast bill and fresh meats served in many forms three times daily. We quote shipping for sets and oversized books.